AutoSPSourceBuilder heads to the PowerShell Gallery!

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File under “why didn’t I do this years ago??”

You can now easily install AutoSPSourceBuilder (my PowerShell-based utility for downloading SharePoint updates and integrating them into the installation media) from the PowerShell Gallery.

TL;DR:

Install-Module -Name AutoSPSourceBuilder

No more need to browse to the GitHub repo, download the zip, extract it, etc. The simple one-liner above will (on any modern Windows machine with installed-by-default PowerShellGet etc.) automatically download and install AutoSPSourceBuilder.ps1 to your default Scripts directory, and make it available to directly run in any PowerShell sessions you launch.

What’s more, the AutoSPInstaller.xml update inventory file, updated on a (roughly) monthly basis and previously bundled with the script, is now by default automatically downloaded at script run-time to ensure you have the latest set of SharePoint updates to choose from. If however for any reason you want to use your own XML inventory, you can opt to skip the xml download and use a local copy of the inventory file by including the new -UseExistingLocalXML switch parameter.

Now that I finally realized just how ridiculously easy it is to publish a script to the Gallery, you can expect to see some more of my stuff make its way there in the near future.

Hopefully this latest batch of changes makes it easier to keep the AutoSPSourceBuilder SharePoint update management tool… updated!

Cheers
Brian

AutoSPInstaller and AutoSPSourceBuilder now work with SharePoint Server 2019

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Just in time for the release of the SharePoint Server 2019 Public Preview, I’ve made probably the most significant updates to two of my open-source offerings in a while… AutoSPInstaller will now install and create a SharePoint 2019 farm (using the Public Preview bits), and AutoSPSourceBuilder will download and integrate the SharePoint 2019 prerequisites – so you can install SharePoint 2019 while offline, without an Internet connection on the target server(s).

Also, I’ve finally converted the AutoSPInstaller functions file to a PowerShell module (!) This should improve the ability to run individual functions, as I plan to make some or all of the functions more easily executable on their own, without depending on or referencing an XML input file.

Check them out, and let me know what you think!

Cheers

The First SharePoint 2016 Post-RTM Update Has Been Released

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SharePoint 2016 is seeing its first post-go-live update – KB2920721 – available for download here: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=51701. You may notice that it doesn’t follow the typical CU naming convention of ubersrv* – that’s because it’s not a cumulative update, but rather just a specific update that contains a single patch sts-x-none.msp.

Things to know about this patch:

  • It does not increment the farm’s configuration database version. Your previously RTM SP2016 farm (as shown in Central Administration) remains at 16.0.4327.1000 after installing this patch, so you’ll need somewhere else like Control Panel –> Programs and Features –> Installed Updates to confirm it’s installed.
  • As with most other SharePoint updates, you must run the SharePoint Products Configuration Wizard after installing the package itself in order to fully commit the patch installation.
  • Also as with most other SharePoint updates, you should be able to extract the .msp patch file to <DriveLetter>:\<SharePointBinaryLocation>\updates (a process called slipstreaming) and use this source when building a new farm from scratch, in order to automatically patch the new farm as it’s being built.
  • The KB article describing what changes are included in the patch is available at http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2920721.

Cheers
Brian

Installing SharePoint 2016 Release Candidate Directly (i.e. Without Manual Patching)

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When SharePoint 2016’s Release Candidate was announced, you may have wondered why (and at the same time been a little sad that) there was no monolithic ISO or executable made available that would allow you to install straight to RC without first having to install the previous public release (Beta 2) first. Well, it turns out there’s a fairly simple way to accomplish a direct-to-RC installation, and it uses a tried & true methodology – slipstreaming!

Here are the high-level steps to go from zero to RC (in your non-Production environments, right?):

  1. Download the SharePoint 2016 Beta 2 bits if you don’t already have them.
  2. (optional) Download any Beta 2 language packs you might require.
  3. Extract/copy the Beta 2 bits to a suitable local or network folder (e.g. C:\SP\2016\SharePoint).
  4. (optional) Extract the language pack(s) to a folder relative to the path above (e.g. C:\SP\2016\LanguagePacks\xx-xx (where xx-xx represents a culture ID, such as de-de)).
  5. Download the SharePoint 2016 RC patch – and don’t forget to select/include the prerequisite installer patch that matches the language of SharePoint 2016 you’re installing.
  6. Download the RC language pack that matches the language of SharePoint 2016 you’re installing (in my case, English). You need this in order to update the built-in language pack.
  7. (optional) Download the corresponding patch for any other language packs you downloaded/extracted previously.
  8. Extract the RC patch to (using the convention above) C:\SP\2016\SharePoint\Updates:

SP2016 Slipstreamed Updates

Note that the wssmui.msp shown above is actually the English language pack patch, which you would have obtained from Step 6. above.

9. Extract the prerequisite installer patch files (downloaded as part of step 5) to C:\SP\2016\SharePoint, overwriting any existing files:

SP2016 Slipstreamed Prerequisiteinstaller

10. (optional) Extract respective RC language patch files to C:\SP\2016\LanguagePacks\xx-xx\Updates:

SP2016 Slipstreamed LangugePack

Careful! All the language pack RC patch files are called wssmui.msp regardless of language, with no quick way to tell them apart. I therefore recommend you extract/copy them one at a time – but again this step only applies if you’re actually installing packs for different languages.

11. Now install SharePoint as you normally would. Patches placed in the correct locations will be automatically picked up and applied during the installation. Note that by this point, the process should look familiar if you’ve ever done slipstreaming in previous versions of SharePoint.

12. Once the installation is complete, verify that the patches were successfully applied in <CentralAdminUrl>/_admin/PatchStatus.aspx. You should see entries for “Update for Microsoft Office 2016 (KB2345678) (wssmui_<cultureID>.msp 16.0.4336.1000)” under each language pack (if applicable):

SP2016 Slipstreamed RC Language Pack

And also “Update for Microsoft Office 2016 (KB2345678) (sts.msp 16.0.4336.1000)” under SharePoint 2016 Preview itself:

SP2016 Slipstreamed Updates

Oh, and the contents of that “readme.txt” file shown in the screen caps above? “Any patches placed in this folder will be applied during initial install.” As though the product was, you know, designed for this 🙂

Cheers
Brian